Apple Turnovers

Updated: Sep 17


For our second recipe upon this blog, I bring you my absolute favorite apple turnover recipe.


Apple turn over baking with puff pastry and knife

For many years and my entire cooking journey, I have tried to make the perfect apple pie. From the filling to the pie crust, I have experimented countless times. After finally accomplishing the perfect pie, I began using my apple pie filling in numerous recipes. And so, I present the best apple turnover recipe with my (almost) famous pie filling.


The filling has the perfect number of apples, a rich cinnamon flavor, a hint of orange zest, and extra sauce to make every bite as enticing as the last.


For the pastry, I used a traditional puff pastry recipe brought to you by Escoffier, a well-known chef in the late 1800s early 1900s who changed how every one of us eats… more on him in another post. You will genuinely be rolling out the history on your countertop with this puff pastry recipe that’s over 100 years old.


Many of you may be wary of puff pastry, laminating of pastry, which is creating little air pockets of buttery goodness can be a challenge sometimes, but don’t worry. My detailed recipe will dissolve any fears you might have.


So I mentioned lamination, but what is this? This method is used to make puff pastry and croissants, so I think back to when you ate one of those. There were little pockets of air and buttery goodness throughout the pastry. But what creates this? Lamination is a method of folding a pastry batter/ dough over itself many times with butter in between. You start with a dough sheet, place butter in the middle, fold the dough over the butter, roll it out, and fold it over itself—each time you do this, your creating layers and layers of butter.


apple filling for apple pie or apple turnover, the wooden spoon and dutch oven

Fast forward to when you put your pastry in the oven, your oven will melt the butter and leave behind the little pockets of air where the butter used to be. This is what makes a pastry so flaky. This may sound like a tricky process, and others may complain about how it takes so long and how it didn’t work. I want you to completely ignore those people and just listen to and try my recipe. It’ll take roughly an hour and a half to make the pastry, but very little of this time is active time.


With that being said, I DO NOT recommend using store-bought puff pastry; it will simply not turn out as good. However, I will turn a blind eye to it just this once. It’ll work; it just won’t be nearly as good as from-scratch cooking.


So let’s dive right into this fantastic recipe that’ll be sure to impress your friends and family while making your house smell like a bakery.


Cheers,

Chef Olson

“The Flying Chef”










Chef Notes

- is it important to use pastry flour? I’ve used all-purpose flour for this recipe before, but it just isn’t the same. I recommend buying Bobs Red Mill pastry flour for this recipe.

- It is absolutely crucial that the puff pastry dough remains cold at all times. If you are not getting the layers you wanted its likely due to your butter warming within the dough or failing to keep clean straight edges while you roll out the dough.

- Puff Pastry can sometimes be tricky, if you have trouble please visit our recipe troubleshooting group and we can help you out.

- These apple turnovers can be frozen if you are cooking for just yourself or a smaller group. Be sure to thaw them out in your refrigerator for a few hours before baking them.


Credit

Escoffier: Le Guide Culinaire

Recent Posts

See All